Light Nelson Event Map and Installation Info 2018

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Enjoying the Light Nelson Event

Installations: Click on the installation numbers to find out more about the installations and artists.

Weather: This is an all-weather event and will be on unless it’s not safe to go ahead. If in doubt check our website or Facebook page (details below). Wear sturdy practical footwear and wrap up warmly.

Route: The route through the Queens Gardens is one way again. Enter via Hardy St main gates, follow the route through Albion Square to take you back to the Hardy Street Hub area. From there, enter the NMIT area (next to A Block) and finish on Alton St.

Phones & Cameras: Share your photos freely on Instagram or Facebook. #lightnelsonevent

Parking: We encourage you to bike, walk or car-share. See parking areas on the map overleaf.
The NMIT park (cnr Nile and Alton) is reserved for elderly and disabled.

Food & Drink: In addition to the Hardy St Hub, NMIT’s Rata Room Restaurant and the Suter Cafe will also be open throughout Light Nelson for hot drinks and warm snacks!

Kids: Backpacks are advised for tiny tots, rather than buggies. Please keep an eye on children at all times. There are unfenced waterways, electric cables, and delicate artworks!

Information Office: Lost children or any other problem? Go to the information office at the Info Hub in Hardy St.

Dogs: No dogs please other than service animals.

Route

To enhance your safety and enjoyment the route through Queens Gardens is one way. Enter via Hardy Street main gates, and walk through to the Bridge and Albion Square exits. Enter the NMIT area from Hardy Street and exit onto the NMIT Arts & Media parking lot.

The Installations & Artists

1. A Trip into the Nature of Being/ Perceptual Engineering

Jon Baxter

One of a small number of invited artists to Light Nelson is Auckland-based Jon Baxter, who has been creating media for film, installations, events, museums and television for over 20 years. Through his company Perceptual Engineering, Jon is a leader of projection mapping in New Zealand. In Light Nelson 2016, Jon’s projections on to NMIT’s old technical institute building in Hardy Street were a firm favourite, and definitely one of the most-videoed and photographed installations. This year he returns to the same site with A Trip into the Nature of Being, using digital mapping to once again paint the building with illuminations and imagery. Be sure to look out for references to some of Nelson’s most famous and infamous characters. This is one of three projects Jon has at Light Nelson 2018, alongside Boing Boing Gloop Machines and Pentakis.

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2. Bored Games

Sarah Arnold

Sarah Arnold has created Bored Games: two plinths comprising interactive and illuminated games of Noughts and Crosses to keep everyone amused on their way into the Queens Gardens. Players activate toggle switches to illuminate their choice of Noughts or Crosses in a race to score three symbols in a row and win this simple game enjoyed by all ages.

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3. Light Gate

Origami by E

Light Gate is an illuminated archway with a suspended patterned geometric ball. The installation is made from plastic sheets, constructed using origami folding techniques and inlaid patterns. Origami by E is a paper artist who has been folding origami for most of his life. He has a real interest in modular origami and applications in building structures and complex 3D designs.

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4. Flying Home

Georgia Marshall*

The inspiration for Flying Home comes from the dramatic decrease in native bush and high number of birds that have become extinct since people arrived in New Zealand. Flying Home features a series of birds made from architect paper and illuminated by fairy lights.

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5. Synesthesia

John-Paul Pochin

Synesthesia is an array of standard and table lamps of various styles and designs, each with their own character. Visitors are invited to play an electronic keyboard to which each lamp will 'listen' and respond to the music played using coloured light in different ways. Synesthesia is a perceptual phenomenon described as a union of the senses – one sensory experience involuntarily, and consistently, prompting another. Composers including Franz Liszt, artists such as Vincent van Gogh, and more recently, musicians such as Lorde reportedly have Synesthesia. The project was inspired by local pianist and composer Zeb Wulff, who has also composed a piece for the project. John-Paul Pochin is a digital artist, photographer and founder of Light Nelson. He remains a member of the Light Nelson Collective, the creative engine for the event, providing a supportive, educational and creative environment, encouraging collaboration and the free sharing of skills and ideas.

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6. Cathy Wheel

Anthony Genet

Nelson glass and neon artist Anthony Genet is well-known for his glass studio and store, Flame Daisy, in Trafalgar Square, with his contemporary handmade vessels and sculptures in striking colours. A return exhibitor at Light Nelson, Anthony has scored one of the prime positions atop the much-loved wooden pedestrian bridge in Queens Gardens. This year, the bridge is closed to pedestrians, making for the perfect position for Cathy Wheel. Anthony has always loved the thrill of fireworks, and so has combined his skills in manipulating colourful hot glass with the qualities of neon, to create a multi-coloured animated sculpture, like a spinning Catherine Wheel firework on a giant scale.

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7. Swimming Upstream

Rangiwahia Enviro Arts Centre Trust (REACT)

Swimming Upstream is about Tuna and Inanga (the Māori words for eels and whitebait) making the near-impossible journey to adulthood. As juveniles making the necessary arduous upstream migration they face the danger of either being caught in nets, or blocked by man-made barriers and changes to the environment. The prevalence of plastic in our waterways is yet another challenge to the wellbeing of our native species. Swimming Upstream emerges from the water using refashioned plastic bottles to highlight the plight and threat to these species, and the increasing likelihood of these endangered species becoming extinct. Rangiwahia Enviro Arts Centre Trust Inc (REACT) is an environmental arts collective based in the Northern Manawatu and are happy to back at Light Nelson for the third time.

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8. Nests

Marcus McShane

Wellington-based Marcus McShane’s varied jobs have included working as a bicycle mechanic, writer, cycle courier and translator. He is currently one of New Zealand’s most prolific lighting designers, having produced more than 400 professional designs over the last ten years, including four works at the 2015 NZ New Performance Festival in New York. Nests is a re-recreation of the nests of three extinct indigenous New Zealand birds – the Whēkau, Huia and Haast Eagle. Using scripts by three award-winning NZ writers – Claire O'Loughlin, Ralph McCubbin Howell and Jamie McCaskill – Nests tells the story of extinction from the birds’ perspective. Nests was originally commissioned by the 2016 NZ Festival as part of the work For the Birds. Marcus has one other work in Light Nelson 2018 – If Words Were Water.

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9. Lighting the Way...

Nelson Suter Art Society

Established in 1889 as The Bishopdale Sketching Club by Bishop Suter and friends, the Nelson Suter Art Society existed some years before the Suter Art Gallery. Intrinsically integrated into Nelson’s vibrant art community, the Society co-ordinate their own on-going exhibition programme in the McKee Gallery (originally built 1973 and new as of October 2016). For Light Nelson 2018, five members of the Society – Anne Braunsteiner, Maggy Johnston, Jason McCormack, Jane Sussimilch and Lee Woodman – are presenting light-based works that can be viewed through the windows of the McKee Gallery, located within The Suter Art Gallery Te Aratoi o Whakatū.

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10. Creatures of the Night

Nelson Suter Art Class

Creatures of the Night is a series of illuminated globes created by students aged 6-18 years who attend after-school art classes at The Suter Art Gallery te Aratoi o Whakatū. Students were asked to think about the large number of nocturnal creatures that inhabit our land, and chose one with personal significance to them. They then created designs to suit their globe and completed the project using watercolour paints.

The Suter holds regular ongoing art classes for children and adults alike.

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11. Bird in a Room

Vincent Ward

New Zealand award-winning filmmaker and artist Vincent Ward is internationally recognised for his ability to convey emotionally charged experiences through his experimental approach to film making. Vincent uses an intuitive visual language to explore ideas of psychic states and our relationship with the physical world. His films have received recognition at the Academy Awards (What Dreams May Come) and Cannes Film Festival (Vigil, The Navigator, Map of the Human Heart). In 2007 Vincent received the New Zealand Order of Merit for his services to film. For Light Nelson, Vincent is projecting two video works on the exterior of The Suter Art Gallery Te Aratoi o Whakatū – Kin/Kaitiaki and Birds. Vincent also has an exhibition at The Suter, Palimpsest/Landscape, until 29 July.

Vincent would like to say a special thanks to Waihoroi Shortland, Georgia Goater, Talulah Holly Massey, Svet Mateev, Jos Wheeler, Shayne Radford, Wang Dongling, John McWilliam and Trish Clark.

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12. Time and Tide

Frog Twissell

Created by evil scientist Frog Twissell, Time and Tide shows how a household object like a digital clock can take on a life of its own when combined with a little 21st century technology.

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13. Le Poisson Plastique

Goldfish Creative

Le Poisson Plastique is a large glowing fish, frozen as it thrashes in the water. Made from around 1500 recycled plastic bags woven onto a wire structure, Le Poisson Plastique highlights one of the major threats to life in our ecosystem. Lightweight plastic bags are easily transported by wind and water, entering storm-water systems and rivers and ending up in the sea. This ghostly fish represents all marine life, and serves as a reminder of our responsibilities as kaitiakitanga. GoldFish Creative is a Wellington-based events company run by David Goldthorpe and Debbie Fish. They have previously created installations for LUX Light Festival and The Performance Arcade in Wellington, The NMMST Keelung Environmental Art Project in Taiwan, and Light Nelson 2016.

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14. If Words Were Water

Marcus McShane

Wellington-based Marcus McShane’s varied jobs have included working as a bicycle mechanic, writer, cycle courier and translator. He is currently one of New Zealand’s most prolific lighting designers, having produced more than 400 professional designs over the last ten years, including four works at the 2015 NZ New Performance Festival in New York. The giant submerged words in If Words Were Water swell and fade in the water, disappearing and then reappearing as different words. The work asks us to consider our relationship with water, gently illuminating the life of the river. If Words Were Water was also part of Wellington’s Lux in 2017. Marcus has one other work in Light Nelson 2018 – Nests.

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15. Today I Saw Somebody

Marcus McShane

Imagine walking through the Queens Gardens, and suddenly, you spot someone who looks a bit like you, well, a lot like you, because it IS you, in reverse, walking towards you. Today I Saw Somebody is a real-time projection of people walking through the Gardens. Captivating and confronting, this is your opportunity to walk on by, and turn your head to see yourself looking back at you... City Cowboy Ltd is Huup Waagen, who works in events management, and also happens to be Site Manager for Light Nelson.

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16. Homing Beacons

Lynda Duncan & Ella Duncan

Created by Lynda Duncan and Ella Duncan, Homing Beacons explores the idea of interstellar microbial life forms searching for a home on earth and colonising those they find. The life forms invade and overcome their hosts, interacting and revealing their anatomy as they consume them. The artists draw on their interests in science fiction/fact, together with their personal responses to colonisation. Homing Beacons is about life, death and renewal, ultimately suggesting that every new colony comes with a cost.

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17. Miescher 1869

Paul Hoverd, Jeet Pandya & Lorraine Saunders*

Meischer 1869 is an ellipse-shaped metal pod with an illuminated kinetic DNA molecule-type structure inside, which rotates on its axis, powered by a small electric motor.

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18. Matrix

Chris Mason

The random falling shapes of Matrix may be fun to look at, but by taking control of the joystick, you can also play a game of Tetris. Chris Mason is a Biomedical Technician at Nelson Hospital by day and has worked on other people’s projects for the last couple of Light Nelsons. This time, he’s stepping out on his own.

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19. Bloom

Dana Easton, Nadia Ryan & Georgia Elliston*

Bloom is a giant hanging flower that can be opened and closed with a pulley. As the flower opens, the lights inside illuminate the petals and cast a delicate light on the ground.

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20. Starry Night

Maggy Johnstone

Maggy Johnston’s art practice is based on ecological art principles where she transforms pre-used materials into unexpected art works, often textile in nature. Maggy’s work also highlights the loss of traditional skills and crafts (such as knitting, crocheting and embroidery) as a result of the development of technology. Starry Night uses pre-used materials that would otherwise be discarded or end up in landfill (including 3000 swizzle sticks). The two chandeliers are an expression of our need to ‘see the light’ and consider the health of our environment. Maggy’s hope is that by changing our behaviour in regards to single-use materials and waste disposal, this planet will once again become a healthy place to live, and that we will be able to look up at the stars and dream!

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21. Mumbrella

Bruce Stilwell

Bruce Stilwell works as a joiner by day, with his true passion being the age-old tradition of ‘string art’. Bruce has taken the concept to the extreme, producing highly sophisticated and stunning artworks that have been exhibited in numerous galleries and art shows around New Zealand, as well as the 2018 Hong Kong Art Fair. Awards include the People’s Choice Award at the 2017 Changing Threads Contemporary Fibre Arts Award in Nelson, and winner at the 2017 Dunedin Art Show. A first-timer at Light Nelson, Mumbrella is a further development of his work, where he has intricately cross-layered more than 10km of thread to create a giant umbrella.

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22. Bird’s Nest

Sean Buick*

Bird’s Nest is made of no.8 and copper wires, with LED lights and plastic eggs nestled inside. The work juxtaposes the metal materials with the natural aesthetic of a bird’s nest.

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23. The Sunken Cathedral

Christopher Vine

I am not at home in the twenty-first century – or even the twentieth century. Given the choice of a time, place and career, it might have been that of a master mason (as architects were then called) in fifteenth century Europe (less the noise, smells, wars, disease etc etc thank you).

The ‘Cathedral Engloutie’ is the nearest I shall ever get to this ideal. The title, taken from a dreary piano piece by Debussy, has haunted me for nearly eighty years, the image of the massive medieval building drowning beneath the waves.

So here we have, based very loosely on what was for centuries one of Europe’s tallest buildings, Antwerp Cathedral’s western tower, its twin was never completed; a gravity defying stone filigree, a tour-de-force of virtuosity.

For the purposes of Light Nelson it is transposed into the modern media of Perspex, stainless steel wire and LEDs, not sinking as Antwerp may in a rising North Sea, but plonked into a small pond in Nelson’s Queens Gardens, one fortieth full size.

Bathos indeed.

Christopher Vine is a retired architect and potter, well known for his championing of Nelson’s heritage.

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24. Pentakis

Perceptual Engineering

One of a small number of invited artists to Light Nelson is Auckland-based Jon Baxter, who has been creating media for film, installations, events, museums and television for over 20 years. Through his company Perceptual Engineering, Jon is a leader of projection mapping in New Zealand. This is one of three projects at Light Nelson, alongside A Trip into the Nature of Being and Boing Boing Gloop Machines.

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25. Boing Boing Gloop Machines

Perceptual Engineering

Pull the rope to make the gloop 'gloop'. Boing Boing Gloop Machines is part of a project that explores interactive projections onto moving screens. Kinect cameras inside the drums read the height of the lycra as you pull the rope. As the height of the lycra changes so do the sounds and visuals. One of a small number of invited artists to Light Nelson, Auckland-based Jon Baxter has been creating media for film, installations, events, museums and television for over 20 years. Through his company Perceptual Engineering, Jon is a leader of projection mapping in New Zealand. This is one of three projects at Light Nelson, alongside A Trip into the Nature of Being and Pentakis.

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26. Monet’s Water Lilies

Tino Muchecheterwa & Katie Grimshaw*

Inspired by Monet’s Water Lilies, flowers made from recycled milk containers float ephemerally in the pond.

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27. Cedar Reborn

The Centre for Fine Woodworking Trust

The Centre for Fine Woodworking is New Zealand’s leading woodworking, furniture-making & design school. A not-for-profit organisation, the Centre has an international reputation attracting tutors and students from all over the world. In 2013, a huge and rare 136-year-old Cyprus Cedar tree planted in Queens Garden by early settlers had to be felled, and Nelson City Council gifted the tree to the Centre to use the timber. Cedar Reborn is a tribute to the grand old tree, the original Māori eel pond and the beautiful leafy landscape of the Queens Gardens. The design was created and made by Lorraine Moss-Smith, a graduate student and Trustee of the school.

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28. The Light Launder

Rayzordoll

The Light Launder uses a found collection of 35mm slides to explore the cyclic nature of hanging out the washing, as metaphor for human memory formation and recollection. At The Light Launder, stranger’s memories are recollected, bathed in light, and put out to air. Abandoned memories are projected onto whimsical washing lines, as if folded into the seams, evoking a sense of voyeurism, in a dreamscape etched from the film’s emulsion. Rayzordoll (Raylene Beals) is a Wellington-based digital archivist, video artist, storyteller, time traveler, and collector of abandoned 35mm slide film. A freelance video editor by day and curator of stranger’s memories by night, she has previously produced art installations that have featured 35mm slide film for Splore Festival and Sundaise. Some of her favorite pastimes are collecting slides, making video art...and rifling through the pockets of op shop clothes, looking for abandoned shopping lists.

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29. The Fantastical Tea Party

Larisse Hall's Youth Art Class

Everyone loves a tea party! You are invited, along with family and friends (imaginary or otherwise) to attend and 'selfie' away, indulging in this sumptuous real life make believe picnic party. Nelson artist Larisse Hall runs children’s art classes from her Art Studio in Stoke. The Fantastical Tea Party is a collaborative project where these budding artists, along with help from Community Art Works (CAW), Tahunanui School, Enner Glynn School and Gaelynne Pound, have created a magical midnight feast for you to enjoy. As an artist, Larisse is captivated by the colour and energy of light, exhibiting her first light sculpture at Light Nelson 2014. This motivated her to infuse her painted works with the colour of light, and after much experimentation, Larisse now produces light infused works of art. Larisse's light sculpture 'Flirt' was long listed in the Aesthetica Art Prize 2015. Larisse has another work in Light Nelson 2018 – Let’s Dance.

Larisse would like to acknowledge and thank the following participants and supporters: Tahunanui Primary School, Enner Glynn Primary School, Community Artworks (CAW), The Menz Shed Nelson, Mitre 10 Mega Nelson, Nelson Recycle Centre, Nelson Pine, The Kitchen Studio, Gaelynne Pound and McNaughton's Furniture.

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30. Kin/Kaitiaki

Vincent Ward

New Zealand award-winning filmmaker and artist Vincent Ward is internationally recognised for his ability to convey emotionally charged experiences through his experimental approach to film making. Vincent uses an intuitive visual language to explore ideas of psychic states and our relationship with the physical world. His films have received recognition at the Academy Awards (What Dreams May Come) and Cannes Film Festival (Vigil, The Navigator, Map of the Human Heart). In 2007 Vincent received the New Zealand Order of Merit for his services to film. For Light Nelson, Vincent is projecting two video works on the exterior of The Suter Art Gallery Te Aratoi o Whakatū – Kin/Kaitiaki and Birds. Vincent also has an exhibition at The Suter, Palimpsest/Landscape, until 29 July.

Vincent would like to say a special thanks to Waihoroi Shortland, Georgia Goater, Talulah Holly Massey, Svet Mateev, Jos Wheeler, Shayne Radford, Wang Dongling, John McWilliam, and Trish Clark.

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31. Oceans Mesh – Our Social Seas

Vicki Smith, Dr Charlotte Šunde & Dr Alison Greenaway

Oceans Mesh – Our Social Seas is a collaborative project between artist Vicki Smith, Dr Charlotte Šunde and Dr Alison Greenway. Charlotte (social science researcher at Cawthron) and Alison (senior social science researcher at Manaaki Whenua Landcare Research) are in the Sustainable Seas National Science Challenge research team www.sustainableseaschallenge.co.nz @sust_seasNZ

Oceans Mesh interweaves the many diverse ways we value our oceans complex and rich ecosystems. Each of us hold precious memories of the moana. Through interviews for this work, marine ecologists and social scientists are sharing stories, their research, and mātauranga Māori perspectives of the sea. The result is an audio visual projection encouraging powerful stories to further evolve around ecosystem based management. Visitors to Oceans Mesh will be invited to share their views about ecosystem based management. Visitor views and views and stories will be projected live onto the Oceansmesh art work. oceansmesh.net

Website: http://oceansmesh.net/

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32. Taking Flight

Sue Heydon

Nelson artist Sue Heydon’s Flight is a memorial to her great grandfather, Alfred William Surridge, who in 1874 sailed from London on the Tintern Abbey, along with his older sister, 307 other emigrants and 870 English birds. Alfred William settled in Temuka, marrying and starting a family of five children, one of whom was Sue’s grandmother, Emily. Despite life proving difficult after his wife’s death at age 32, Alfred William developed his creative abilities as a sign writer, paperhanger and painter, eventually establishing his own business. Located in the brick Munitions Building (1871) on Albion Square, Flight uses four purpose-made artefacts: a beeswax candle, a wooden birdcage, a pewter birdfeeder and a copper feather. Together they link Alfred William’s experiences and struggles through life with those of the captured, constrained birds and their final release into an unknown country.

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33. Meeting Place

Jingshu Jiang & Yuyan Jiang*

Meeting Place is inspired by traditional Chinese lantern festivals, which are the perfect opportunity for people to meet and gather with friends. People can walk through Meeting Place’s many fabric panels to meet in the center, and whether they are friends or strangers, they can all enjoy the pleasure of meeting each other. The lighting creates shadows of the people inside, visible as you approach.

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34. Mr Science

DNA Factory

Come learn about DNA, and help make the longest model in the world. The DNA Factory is an attempt at the world record for the longest DNA molecule (currently 65 meters). Over the five nights of Light Nelson, Mr Science, with help from kids and parents, will attempt to build a glowing DNA strand over 75 meters long. Watch as it gets longer and longer, hanging from tree branches and snaking along the road.

But wait, there’s more…The Obliteration Room
A must for the kids, this is a black room charged with a powerful UV LED Strobe. Kids are invited to cover the walls with fluro stickers, creating a dazzling work of art. Not for the faint hearted.

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35. Triple E – Eclectic Electric Explorers

Community Art Works (CAW)

Triple E – Eclectic Electric Explorers celebrate the ideals of making the impossible possible, the incredulous incredible, and the eclectic electric. Triple E – Eclectic Electric Explorers are a group of five over-the-top and comical Edwardian characters who will be roving throughout the evening. Their costumes are lit with micro-computer driven LEDs, creating a myriad of dazzling patterns. As artists, they fuse contemporary circus and performance with cutting-edge prop manipulation and technology. The Explorers have been bought to Nelson by Community Arts Works (CAW), one of Nelson’s most dynamic community outreach programmes, giving access to the arts to all sectors of the community.

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36. Beam Me Up

Klaasz Breukel

Beam Me Up is an unidentified object hanging in the sky, sending down a beam of light. Stand in the illuminated spot and have a friend take a photo as you imagine being beamed up to the Mothership. The installation is one of three by Klaasz Breukel, one of the founding members of Light Nelson, who also works at NMIT as a graphic design and fine arts tutor.

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37. Shelter

Victory Primary School

Shelter is a project by Year 4, 5 and 6 Students at Victory Primary School, led by their teachers Lynda Duncan, Ash Della Bosca, Dylan Turnbull and Scott Davis. Shelter is a celebration of the love of stories about the dark that are present in every culture. It is an exploration of what shelter can mean if you have lost yours, and a demonstration of the student’s understanding of the science, magic and mystery of light. Students have drawn on their own culture and language to create panels of 2D and 3D works which allow/diffuse and obscure the light. Student have used narratives and songs in their own languages to create the soundscape, drawing in the viewer and linking the images.

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38. Let’s Dance

Larisse Hall

Larisse Hall‘s Let’s Dance is activated by ‘piano keys’. Combining the traditional piano with the classic jukebox, this dance floor is 'played' by the public, who can step on keys to select the music, and then dance the night away. As an artist, Larisse is captivated by the colour and energy of light, exhibiting her first light sculpture at Light Nelson 2014. This motivated her to infuse her painted works with the colour of physical light, and after much experimentation, Larisse now produces light infused works of art. Larisse's light sculpture 'Flirt' was long listed in the Aesthetica Art Prize 2015. Larisse also has another work in Light Nelson 2018 – The Fantastical Tea Party.

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39. Reflection Perception

Nocturnal/Delainy Kennedy

What will you see in your reflection? Look past this reality into the infinite possibilities of an alternate world. Created by Delainy Kennedy of Nocturnal, Reflection Perception is an inter-dimensional portal offering the viewer a unique interactive visual experience.

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40. Hex

Nocturnal

Hex is an interactive projection and sound experience of prime proportions. Bring Hex to life by composing your own geometric spectacle. Featuring original music by Gene Kennedy.

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41. The Crystalline Tunnel

Jordan McCracken & Serena Miller*

The Crystalline Tunnel is an ethereal and tactile tunnel of light, beckoning with its soft and mysterious lights. Walk through to see the glowworm-like strands, tickling your face as you pass. Illuminated with glow-in-the-dark paint, the tunnel is decorated with crystals, sparkling with LEDs, transporting you to a planet with bioluminescent life.

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42. Look Hear!

Fritz Kuckuck and Maria Grau

Created by Nelson duo Maria Grau and Fritz Kuckuck, Look Hear! is an interactive musical installation. Three frames are filled with ‘strings’ made of light that emit sounds when the strings are ‘plucked’ by passers-by. The whole family can play this whimsical light instrument together by reaching into the frames and creating a magical soundscape. It’s a literal interaction with thin air, creating sound from light – touch a light beam and hear the result. This is the second project for Maria and Fritz for Light Nelson. Distillers by day, Light Nelson allows them to turn their personal fascination with the technology of light and sound into shared public experiences.

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43. Standing Waves

AV Architects

AV Architects has recently changed hands with two creative young gentlemen taking the helm, and is looking to re-enter the Nelson arts scene, along with providing a solid AV and Home Automation service to Nelsonians. Having a long history in sound design, AV Architects thought it would be nice to try and represent sound with light, as both sound and light share similar wave-like properties. To this end, AV Architects are elaborating on their renegade installation in 2016 and creating Standing Waves, which has several standing waves of light at different frequencies, accompanied by sounds, and potentially a few little surprises thrown in!

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44. Fluoresce

Katie Pascoe

Fluoresce is jewellery for a building. Based on the industrial unit – the light tube – Fluoresce examines the notion of wearing spaces. Fluoresce is not only an artwork in itself, but it also illuminates its ‘wearer’, in this case, a building. The work belongs to the expanding field of contemporary jewellery where notions of jewellery/object are on a sliding scale. Katie Pascoe is currently involved in a contemporary jewellery mentorship programme, The Handshake Project. She is interested in the crossovers between objects and jewellery, and how these relate to the human body, even on a grand scale.

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45. Entity

Storybox

A mandala is a spiritual and ritual symbol in Hinduism and Buddhism, representing the universe. Entity is a projection of a digital mandala that uses input from onlookers to create an ever-changing array of images and colours. Visitors can use a customised search engine to enter an offering to Entity, which then becomes a kaleidoscope of imagery from the vast universe of the internet. Entity uses the mandala as a kind of spiritual teaching tool, a way of making a sacred space and as an aid to meditation and trance induction. The work sees the mandala as a microcosm of the universe – in this case, the digital universe. Entity has been travelling the world since 2014, seen at light festivals in Wellington, Auckland, Turkey and Portugal. Based in Wellington, Storybox is an award-winning creative studio that specialises in finding innovative ways to connect with audiences and tell meaningful stories.

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46. iLOOminiation

Nelson Atomic Gardening Society

First impressions can be misleading. The Nelson Atomic Gardening Society embrace the wonders of spontaneous mutation, and enjoy planting irradiated seeds of audiovisual curiosity in the community. iLOOmination is their latest experiment.

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47. Reflection

James Wheatley

Landscape designer James Wheatley has created a peaceful water garden setting with native trees and ferns around a water feature that uses cymatic waves from hidden base speakers. The ripples and patterns fuse with light and sound to create an area that resonates with the history of the space before it became a car park. Reflection has a clear message that links our disturbing disconnection with wilderness to the future of our designed spaces, and the continued evolution of ecosystems. Suppressed and heavily blinkered beneath the tarmac, the land still has eyes. Reflection is a collaboration between James and a technical team led by sound specialists Janja and Mark Heathfield. James designs and builds gardens around the country and overseas, and regularly exhibits at Chelsea Flower Show in the UK. The experience of creating high-profile award-winning show gardens has led to numerous installation projects for festivals and film.

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48. The Seeds of Revolution

Andy Robertson*

The Seeds of Revolution explores themes of continuity and waste. Using the principles of a zoetrope (19th century animation wheels), and using scrap materials from Nelson's ReStore initiative, Seeds plays with pattern-through-motion, with an invitation to come in for a closer look.

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49. Anyone’s Game

Jon Neill

Who can resist a game of noughts and crosses? Created by Jon Neill, Anyone’s Game is everyone’s favourite game on a grand scale, made of recycled 20litre PUC containers with an interior light. Pick your rival, get ready, and play!

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50. Flow

Adam Lister

Flow is a sculpture that explores our misuse of waterways, and how we all take water for granted. Made from UPVC pressure piping, the figure sports a lightbulb head.

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51. Projector 303

Klaasz Breukel

Projector 303 is a projection installation that comes to life after dark, with changing projection sequences that are video-mapped onto a shape on a window at NMIT’s G Block. The installation is one of three by Klaasz Breukel, one of the founding members of Light Nelson, who also works at NMIT as a graphic design and fine arts tutor.

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52. Art Sparks: Joy

Janja Heathfield, Kim Ireland & Burnt Pixel

Art Sparks: Joy is an immersive installation created by sound designer Janja Heathfield, visual artist Kim Ireland, and multimedia artist Burnt Pixel. Visitors put on headphones and walk through a labyrinth-style tunnel of projected lighting and real-time drawings. The soundscape of music and spoken word is an introspective journey of colour and movement. Janja is an audio engineer and designer, working in the industry, assisting with concerts, films and multi-media presentations for festivals in the region. Kim is a Nelson-based visual artist and was a finalist in the 2017 Parkin Drawing Award. Burnt Pixel cuts-up and reprograms found footage to create interactive and generative video-art pieces.

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53. Electrokrohm

Paul Hargreaves, Ryan Beehre & Klaasz Breukel

Has a race of aliens been sent to Planet Earth in order to create chaos? Board the Nova Express and find out. Electrokrohm is an audio/visual performance by Ryan Beehre, Paul Hargreaves and Klaasz Breukel with synthesizers, light, and visuals.

https://www.facebook.com/electrokrohm/

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54 to 65

Ryan Beehre, Paul Hargreaves & Klaasz Breukel

Pincushion - Wendy Beattie & Cristina Rule*

‘Pincushion’ is inspired by the delicate forms of scabiosa (honeysuckle) seedpods, recreating that moment when the seeds are being carried away from the parent plant.

Ode to Lotte Reiniger - Shaun Robinson*

The lightboxes 'Ode to Lotte Reiniger' celebrate life and nature, and the pods within.

Artichoke - Aiden Smith & Ollie Corby*

Based on the appealing repetitive pattern of the petals of an artichoke, the work is illuminated from the inside.

Shadows - Tim Evans & Quinn Webster*

'Shadows' is a sculptural piece with a single light source to create a shadow on the wall behind. As the object is rotated, so too does its shadow morph and change.

Re-establish - Escher Kelaher*

'Re-establish' explores the ideas of abandonment and how nature reclaims urban environments after people have left. There is a definite sense of mystery and curiosity that often comes from an abandoned space.'Re-establish' is a vibrant regrowth of greenery, stemming from the abandoned box.

Tahu-nui-a-rangi - Sarah Brooke*

We live at the end of the earth. We don’t have to travel far to see the Southern Lights. Sarah wonders about her ancestors in the cold winter nights, staring at the sky and the beautiful show of the Ranginui. Tahu-nui-a-rangi recreates the Southern Lights, bringing them north for us to enjoy.

Cacti - Isabella Garwood*

Cacti is a recreated desert-like scene, complete with a cactus made from recycled Mountain Dew bottles. The inspiration for ‘Cacti’ springs from Isabella’s love of cacti and their protective armor and ability to thrive in hot climates.

Into the Alpine - Tamara Shone*

After embarking on a tramping trip through the Nelson Lakes, Tamara was inspired to create an installation that celebrates the terrain, weather conditions, flora and fauna, as well as the journey itself. ‘Into the Alpine’ consists of two suspended Perspex panels, which have been bent and shaped, and then lasercut with engravings.

Blight - Astrid L Jeppesen*

Blight is an installation that explores human’s influence on the world, and the pollution that we are forever producing. ‘Blight’ consist of bulk polystyrene boxes and palettes, arranged in a pile to depict the discarded and non-recyclable products that have been made for the use of simple packaging. Footage of compacted plastics and copper-coloured metallic enamel is projected onto the waste mountain.

The Hometown - Kahu Gillespie*

The Hometown is a series of panels made of frost cloth, onto which video is projected using a selection of Kahu’s own recordings and footage in the style of archival video. The project explores human habitation and how it has changed over time.

Stop Chopping - Siying Xue*

There is an expectation that we could be free from pollution and destruction, despite much of the earth’s natural ecology having already been destroyed. ‘Stop Chopping’ consists of two tree trunks, made with a frame and covered with paper. The light placed inside is reminiscent of a Chinese lantern.

Vitiate - Miya Austin-Dobie*

Plastic is a silent killer, guilty of killing our oceans. ‘Vitiate’ is made from recycled plastics, and symbolises the plastic wasteland that our oceans are fast becoming.

Mutated Mermaid - Sally Blackwell*

‘Mutated Mermaid’ focuses on the pollution crisis in the North Sea and its effect on marine habitats. Using papier-mâché, wire, fairy lights and recyclable materials, the mermaid sculpture explores how different an historic fairy tale would be with the influences of today’s ocean pollution.

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66. 1000 Cranes

Melissa Millard

Based in a little satellite site at Pocket Park on Bridge Street, Nelson artist Melissa Millard has created 1000 Cranes. The 1000 cranes refer to the much-loved and often-told Japanese story of whoever folds 1000 cranes will be granted a wish. 1000 Cranes is a whimsical display intended to inspire hope and create a sense of wonder, as well as prompting visitors to think about what their one wish might be. A first-time exhibitor in Light Nelson, Melissa is trained in Architecture and is passionate about creating interventions (or installations) that encourage curiosity of the environments we engage with on a daily basis. She uses her work to question the way we perceive and interact with our experiences of space, and to create greater awareness and understanding of who we are.

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*NMIT Student(s)

Please note: The placement of the installation numbers on this map are indicative only, their exact location may vary slightly at the event. Late changes may be necessary in an event such as this. The organisers reserve the right to make alterations to this programme.


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Enjoying the Event

Installations:

Click on the installation numbers to find out more about the installations and artists.

Weather:

This is an all-weather event and will be on unless it’s not safe to go ahead. If in doubt check our website or Facebook page (details below). Wear sturdy practical footwear and wrap up warmly.

Route:

The route through the Queens Gardens is one way again. Enter via Hardy St main gates, follow the route through Albion Square to take you back to the Hardy Street Hub area. From there, enter the NMIT area (next to A Block) and finish on Alton St.

Phones & Cameras:

Share your photos freely on Instagram or Facebook. #lightnelsonevent

Parking

We encourage you to bike, walk or car-share. See parking areas on the map overleaf.
The NMIT park (cnr Nile and Alton) is reserved for elderly and disabled.

Food & Drink

In addition to the Hardy St Hub, NMIT’s Rata Room Restaurant and the Suter Cafe will also be open throughout Light Nelson for hot drinks and warm snacks!

Kids

Backpacks are advised for tiny tots, rather than buggies. Please keep an eye on children at all times. There are unfenced waterways, electric cables, and delicate artworks!

Information Office

Lost children or any other problem? Go to the information office at the Info Hub in Hardy St.

Dogs

No dogs please other than service animals.

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